Midge Madness – the Pyramid Buzzer

I’ve been playing with a new chironomid pattern for Pyramid. Truth be told you could probably catch a lot of fish at the ‘Mid with just a bead on a hook and some black or red thread covered in glue. Cutthroat aren’t exactly rocket scientists. Fortunately for you, In my ADD head, thread midges are really boring. Consequently I’ve been messing around with a new pattern and the fish seem to like it so far. I figured I’d share. It’s like a hybrid of the European loch buzzers and the holographic midges developed by Bill Ladner and Joe Winchester for use at Pyramid.

Slide a bead on a hook.(white, silver or nickel) Ive really been digging the nickel lately, but I ran out, so for this one I’m using white.  I usually use a Tiemco 2457 hook since the wire is nice and stout. Size 8 down to size 14 should be fine. I wouldn’t go much smaller or your hooks have a decent chance of bending out on a big fish. Even the 14 can be a bit sketchy if you try to horse in a fish at all.

Start the thread behind the bead. Choice of thread isn’t super important, I usually use black(or other matching color) 3/0 monocord since its quicker to build up bulk behind the bead, but 6/0 is good too.

Image

Catch in some small wire in 2 colors. I’m using hot orange and silver, but feel free to swap the orange for red, wine, black, etc. I usually keep the silver as a constant, but that’s not set in stone. Image

Keep winding toward the bend and catch in some black holographic tinsel. Sometimes I use some black holographic saltwater flashabou since its a little thicker and wraps faster. As long as you don’t use the super small stuff you should be fine. Image

Keep winding thread around the bend until you’re roughly around the same as the next shot. Next wrap the thread forward to the bead.

Image

Wrap a single layer of the tinsel towards the bead.

Image

Next wrap the wires together towards the bead. I usually make the wraps a little closer and gradually widen the wraps as I get closer to the bead. (I didn’t do it as much as normal on this example, but I think you’ll catch my drift)  Make sure to try to keep the wires together, sometimes it takes some fidgeting.

Image

Tie down the wire behind the bead. Cut or just break off the excess wire.

Image

Tie in some orange holographic tinsel. (If you’re wrapping with a red/silver wire combination, maybe try red tinsel). Tie in the tinsel so its angling slightly down on each side.

Image

Image

Wrap the thread back and bulk up the thorax, so its a little longer then the bead, but not quite as thick. Image

Pull the tinsel forward to the bead, angling upwards diagonally.

Image

To make the front of the fly a little tougher, I pull the tinsel back, make a wrap or two and then whip finish.

Image

Cut the thread and snip off the excess tinsel with some fine pointed scissors so you don’t leave too much excess.

Image

Apply a couple coats of Sally Hansen’s hard as nails and you’re good to go.

Image

Finished fly.

Image

Now go catch some cutties! Good luck, Dan –

Image

Image

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s